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A federal judge ruled yesterday that prosecutors can tell jurors about incriminating statements that the suspected December 25 airline bomber, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, ?made while being interrogated by federal agents.
U.S. District Judge, Nancy Edmunds, said in her ruling that national security fears justified federal agents not reading Abdulmutallab his Miranda rights before interrogating him at the University of Michigan hospital following the failed Christmas Day 2009 terror attack.
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Based on testimony from a burn unit nurse, she found Abdulmutallab was lucid and not confused despite being administered a powerful painkiller.
A Wayne State University professor provided testimony Thursday in federal court about the impact a powerful painkiller had on Abdulmutallab while being questioned by federal agents.
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Wayne State University Professor Dr. Eugene Schoener said the fast-acting drug fentanyl wears off quickly and said he did not believe Abdulmutallab was impaired while being questioned following the alleged terror attack.?
It was also confirmed that the terror suspect was also cross examined by the self-professed al-Qaeda operative's legal adviser, Anthony Chambers.
“There are no reports Abdulmutallab was confused or hallucinating after being administered 300 micrograms of fentanyl at the University of Michigan Hospital in the hours after the terror attack,” Schoener told Chambers on Thursday.
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“He was interactive; he was responding appropriately to questions. That doesn't suggest confusion,” he further testified.
While being interrogated by federal agents, Abdulmutallab said he was working for al-Qaeda, trained in Yemen and that the bomb he is accused of concealing in his underwear was built by a bomb maker in Saudi Arabia.